Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Too early for ECB tightening

In her statements after this week’s policy meeting, ECB President Christine Lagarde talked about a double-dip recession in the euro zone. Looking at today’s flash Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) survey results for January, it seems as if the downturn has continued into the first quarter. However, Lagarde also rattled markets by mentioning that asset purchases might be wound down early under certain conditions. Is this the end of monetary policy support? And what is the outlook for markets?

Mme Lagarde stated that risks to euro zone growth remain tilted to the downside but that they were “less pronounced” than before, given the roll-out in vaccines. She also reiterated previous guidance that the ECB’s asset purchase programme need not be used in full if financing conditions can be kept easy without it. Although not new, these comments sparked a sell-off in 10-year bonds, with traders pushing yields higher (+3.2bp on German Bunds, +6.7bp on Italian BTPs, for example).

The ECB comments come against a background of spreading infections and extended lockdowns in the EU. The average number of new confirmed cases over the past seven days ranges from 12.5 per 100,000 inhabitants in Germany to 52.3 in Spain, well above the global average of 5.3. The resulting strain on healthcare systems combined with the emergence of new, more virulent strains (such as the B117 mutation first identified in the UK) has forced many governments to tighten restrictions. Germany’s lockdown has been extended till mid-February at least, France has imposed a nationwide curfew at 18:00 and Prime Minister Johnson has suggested that the UK’s lockdowns may last until summer.

Vaccination programmes across the euro zone have got off to a slow start. On Worldometers.com data, Germany has vaccinated 1.7% of its population to date, France only 1.1%, Italy 2.1% and Spain 2.4%. In comparison, the United States has been able to
inoculate 5.0% of its population and the United Kingdom 8.1% (see left-hand chart below). Of course, the UK and the US got a
head start on the European Union by giving emergency use authorisations for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine on December 3 and 12 respectively whereas the EU waited until December 21 to issue its approval, meaning that vaccinations only really got underway in early January. These delays matter of course because the sooner a substantial proportion of the population has been inoculated, the quicker lockdown restrictions can be eased.

The flash estimates for January’s PMI surveys suggest that the euro zone continues to face difficult conditions. The composite index has fallen to 47.5 from 49.1 in December versus consensus forecasts for 47.6, well below the 50.0 level which marks the frontier between expansion and contraction. Unsurprisingly, the bulk of the decline came in services where confidence fell to 45.0 – services, which represent the vast majority of GDP in advanced economies, are the most sensitive to lockdown restrictions.

In her comments on January 21, Christine Lagarde also went out of her way to stress that the ECB statement on financial conditions should not be interpreted as being “hawkish” (i.e., pointing to more restrictive policy settings). Indeed, she confirmed that the asset purchase programmes could be “recalibrated” to easier settings if necessary. And looking at bank credit conditions (see right-hand chart below), it is difficult to argue that financial conditions are too accommodative at present.

Bottom line. Tighter and longer lockdowns across Europe are likely to prolong recession conditions into the first quarter. Moreover, the slow start to vaccinations in the EU is likely to delay cyclical recovery until the second half. However, this means that the policy mix of monetary and fiscal policy is likely to remain very supportive throughout the year in our view. As a result, investors are likely to continue to focus on the longer term rather than on near-term risks to activity.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking