Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Rotation's Turn?

Vaccination programmes continue to make good progress, President Biden has just signed into law a $1.9 trillion fiscal aid package and investors are gaining confidence in the cyclical outlook for recovery. This has pushed bond yields sharply higher on hopes of reflation, sparking a rotation in equity markets into laggard sectors and markets. Are the hopes of recovery justified and what does all this mean for markets?

In the euro zone, vaccination programmes have finally begun to accelerate. In France for example, there have been 2.1 jabs per 100 inhabitants over the past 7 days, up from 1.2 a fortnight ago and taking total inoculations to 9.5 per 100. Moreover, the European Medicines Agency has now recommended a fourth vaccine produced by Johnson & Johnson for all adults, the first that only requires a single dose – with 200m doses already on order for 2021, this will go some way to compensate for the production delays experienced by another supplier, AstraZeneca.
This progress reinforces our conviction that governments will be able to ease lockdown and curfew restrictions by late spring, enabling a synchronised cyclical recovery in the second half of this year. In the US, certain states have already begun to ease restrictions, enabling hiring to resume. For now, European economies, where stringent restrictions remain the norm, are still mired in recession but we expect euro zone members to follow the UK’s lead in setting out roadmaps in coming months to exit lockdowns as increasing numbers are vaccinated.
This economic backdrop has pushed our economists to revise their global GDP forecasts for 2021 higher, taking US growth to 4.9% and the euro zone to 4.1%, the fastest pace in 20 years thanks to rapid recovery in H2. In turn, this economic upturn will foster a cyclical pick-up in earnings, particularly in those regions and sectors with the greatest operating leverage. This explains why expectations for profit growth are higher in the euro zone than in the US, which is heavily weighted towards large cap “Growth” stocks in sectors like information technology (the IBES consensus estimates for 2021 are 37.7% and 23.9% respectively).
In terms of sectors, the greatest earnings upside is in “Value” sectors, such as energy, materials or industrials for example. Index providers like MSCI have divided their stock universe into two categories – Growth in historic and forecast earnings and sales and Value in the book value to price ratio, dividend yield and low price-to-earnings ratios. Not unsurprisingly, Growth stocks have dramatically outperformed Value over the post-subprime crisis period as investors have placed a premium on earnings growth, which has been a rare commodity in a sluggish global economy. Moreover, central banks have kept liquidity abundant via asset purchases and interest rates at historic lows, which has boosted Growth stock valuations close to historical highs. Looking ahead therefore, the stage might seem set for a reversal in investor preferences with Value stocks regaining some of the lost ground in recent months. Moreover, as argued in recent reports, this movement has been aided by steepening yield curves, which have taken some of the shine off Growth stock valuations and rekindled interest in Value. However, we would caution against a wholesale switch into Value. Although long rates are set to remain above crisis lows, we expect central banks to remain active buyers of fixed income bonds, which will help keep sovereign yields lower than they would have been otherwise.

Bottom line. We expect central banks to keep a cap on bond yields, meaning that further steepening in the yield curve (often a prerequisite for Value stock outperformance) is unlikely. Moreover, Growth stocks have been popular for solid fundamental reasons – the cyclical pick-up in activity is unlikely to impair their long-term earnings potential. All in all, we recommend keeping a broad diversification across both Growth and Value in portfolios.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking