Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Of stimulus and prices

Recent discussions in Washington have strengthened hope that President Biden’s $1.9 tn fiscal plan could make progress in Congress, while the rapid ramp-up in vaccinations – 10.2% of the US population, 15.8% in the UK (see the left-hand chart below) – has lent weight to the prospect of cyclical economic recovery later this year. With recent inflation figures in the euro zone and
the US surprising on the upside, investors have continued to position themselves for reflation. What does all this mean for the economic outlook and for markets?

This week, Biden began talks with a group of moderate Republican senators who had proposed a $618 bn alternative plan. Although the Democrats’ majority in Congress means bipartisan support for his package may not be necessary, the President is looking to the longer term. By seeking to build bridges and engage with the Republicans, he may slow approval of the current plan but he may also garner support for his separate $2 tn stimulus plan which is due later this year.

The two plans are very different in nature. The current proposal seeks to provide support for households (via $1,400 cheques), schoolchildren ($130 bn to accelerate school reopenings), the unemployed (an additional $400 per week in benefits) and state and local governments ($350 bn cash injection to prevent lay-offs of public sector employees). The second plan aims to focus on investment in green energy technologies and infrastructure, for example in transportation, electricity and construction. Where the first plan throws a lifeline to cope with the crisis, the second is designed to enhance long-term growth potential.

US core Personal Consumption Expenditure prices (i.e., ex volatile items like food and energy) rose 0.3% MoM in December, taking the YoY rate from 1.4% to 1.5%. While this still leaves the Federal Reserve’s preferred measure below target, market expectations for inflation have risen sharply. The 10-year breakeven inflation rate – calculated by subtracting yields on inflationlinked bonds from those on nominal bonds – hit 2.17% this week, up from 0.55% last March and the highest since October 2018.

Inflation in the euro zone also appears to be on the rise. This week saw the publication of the consumer price index estimates for January which came in well above forecasts. Headline prices rose 0.9% YoY, having averaged -0.3% over the previous five months, while the core figure jumped from 0.2% in December to 1.4%. However, this upside surprise was driven by some oneoff factors – in Germany for example, the cut in VAT from 19% to 16% expired, pushing up prices, while in some countries like France, traditional New Year sales were postponed because of lockdown restrictions, flattering YoY comparisons for prices of many household and personal goods. 

In addition, there may be some early warning signs that the rise in inflation expectations has become extended. As illustrated in the right-hand chart, the difference between US 10-year and 2-year breakevens has recently inverted – i.e., short-term expectations are now higher – a configuration which has often preceded a decline in longer-term expectations.

Bottom line. The ramp-up in vaccinations will help countries ease restrictions later this year, first in the UK and the US followed some weeks later by the EU, where only 3.3% of the population has been inoculated so far. As a result, we expect a cyclical recovery in activity in H2 2021, with the fastest growth registered by those countries where lockdowns were the most severe. However, output gaps remain high and we do not expect the current bounce in inflation to be long-lasting. All told, we expect this year’s economic backdrop to favour equity markets over fixed income, given historically low yields and tight credit spreads.

Read full article​​​​​​​

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking