Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Game Over? Not yet...

Ever since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) in 2007-2008, economic policy settings have been kept very stimulative. Fiscal support has maintained budget deficits at historically high levels while central banks have kept policy very loose – key rates have rarely crept above inflation and asset holdings have never returned to pre-GFC levels. These high levels of policy support have bolstered economies and boosted asset prices in recent years. With two G7 central banks recently announcing a reduced pace in asset purchases, what is the outlook for markets?

In late April, the Bank of Canada (BoC) was the first to move when it announced the tapering of its asset purchases from C$4bn per week to C$3bn. It justified this move by pointing to a dramatic upgrade in its forecasts – in January it had expected first quarter (Q1) GDP to fall by -0.6% quarter-on-quarter (QoQ) whereas growth is now forecast at 1.6%, thanks to vigorous fiscal support in the face of the latest wave of infections. This takes 2021 growth estimates to 6.5% from only 4% in January and the BoC now expects that by H2 2022, all economic slack will have been absorbed and inflation will be sustainably around its 2% target.

At its meeting in early May, the Bank of England (BoE) made no changes to policy settings, keeping its policy rate at 0.1% and holding the total size of its asset purchase programme steady at £895bn. Like the BoC, the BoE revised its 2021 growth forecasts higher, to +7.25% versus its previous +5% estimate. This means that GDP will be back to pre-crisis levels by Q4 this year, a quarter earlier than previously thought, thanks to faster consumption of pent-up demand. And, like the BoC, the BoE announced it would reduce the weekly pace of its asset purchases, from £4.44bn to £3.44bn. In his statement to the markets, BoE governor Bailey went out of his way to emphasise that this was a mechanical change rather than a signal that policy is being tightened. The BoE had fixed a £190bn envelope for asset purchases this year, implying as £3.7bn weekly rate – by reducing the weekly pace, Bailey is simply spreading the remaining purchases out evenly over the rest of the year. This explanation is borne out by the bank’s longer-term forecasts for GDP growth – 2022 has been cut from 7.25% to 5.75% and 2023 left unchanged at a modest 1.25%.

The European Central Bank (ECB) and the Federal Reserve (Fed) show no sign of following suit however. The ECB announced that it would accelerate the pace of asset purchases in Q2 given the perceived tightening in monetary conditions and, indeed, the weekly pace of its Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme buying has accelerated by 33% since Easter reaching €25.3bn. The US Fed has stuck to its monthly target of $120bn in purchases despite the recent string of stronger confidence data – for example, the March Institute of Supply Management survey of manufacturers hit a 37-year high, before easing back in April. Recent statements from Fed decision-makers have been consistent. Although the economic outlook has brightened, there is still a long way to go before the Fed tightens – one fifth of the workforce in the lower income categories is still unemployed and the Fed remains convinced that this year’s spike in inflation will prove transitory. These views were given some weight by the April payroll data – observers were disappointed to see only 266,000 new jobs added and the unemployment rate edging up to 6.1%.

Bottom line. We continue to expect a solid cyclical recovery in activity in the second half, in particular in Europe. However, we do not expect a lasting pick-up in inflation – output gaps remain very wide, the global labour market still has enormous slack and structural disinflationary forces (such as aging demographics and innovative technologies) have not disappeared. In this context, central banks are likely to keep policy very accommodative, which should continue to support risk appetite

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking