Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - Money supplied

In recent days, the European Central Bank (ECB) and then the US Federal Reserve (Fed) have published the minutes of their latest policy discussions against a backdrop of improving economic data. How solid is the pick-up in the economy? And what is the outlook for central bank policy?

Data releases across the globe have set new records in recent months. Initially, they reflected the overnight shift from steady growth to lockdown and recession. And then, as countries began to see coronavirus cases falling and felt emboldened to reopen their economies, business and household confidence began to recover sharply. In the US, June saw 4.8 million new jobs created, taking unemployment down from a high of 14.7% in April to 11.1%. And in the euro zone, the composite Purchasing Manager Index (PMI) for June hit 48.5 points (50 marks the dividing line between expansion and contraction), up from 13.6 in April.

However, we shouldn’t read too much into month-on-month data at this stage – statisticians face enormous difficulties in measuring activity during this worldwide pandemic. For example, the Bureau of Labour Statistics – which publishes the US jobs report – has recognised that recent months’ surveys have overstated the fall in unemployment. Moreover, June’s jobless rate remains well above the peak registered during the Great Recession at 10.0% in October 2009.

In addition, month-on-month (MoM) changes can be rather meaningless at turning points. As illustrated in the left-hand chart, US manufacturing production has bounced sharply MoM. However, the right-hand chart shows just how far below previous output levels we remain. PMI surveys can also be somewhat misleading. Companies are simply asked if activity levels are higher, the same or lower than the previous month – when factories were closed the month before, even modest output would mark an improvement and skew the survey results higher.

Turning now to the ECB, the latest meeting saw policy-makers increase the size of the Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP) from €750bn to €1,350bn. However, the key passage in the minutes was a discussion about the “proportionality” of the PEPP. This was significant because one of the charges laid by German Constitutional Court at the ECB’s door was that they did not appear to have taken the proportionality of their measures into account. By including this analysis in the minutes which are publicly available, the ECB is enabling the German government and the Bundesbank to go back to the court with reassurance that their demands have been met.

The Fed’s minutes were also significant, but for different reasons. In recent months, investors have speculated that the Fed would follow the Bank of Japan and Reserve Bank of Australia and adopt a policy of “yield-curve control”. This involves a central bank communicating an explicit yield target – say 0.7% for 10-year Treasuries – and undertaking to buy as many bonds as necessary to keep yields around that level. In practice, a credible commitment often proves sufficient, enabling the central bank to scale back its purchases. The transcript revealed that the Fed has decided against this policy, meaning that it will continue to buy Treasuries in vast quantities. This will of course keep yields low but, crucially, it also means that the Fed will continue to absorb a sizable part of the Treasury’s borrowing needs to finance the Administration’s enormous COVID-19 related deficits.

Bottom line. We believe that lockdown restrictions will only be lifted gradually by governments to avoid a worsening of the pandemic, thereby slowing the pace of recovery. Indeed, some states in the South and West of the US have tightened restrictions again in light of the rapid second wave of virus infections. However, recent events have provided comfort that the ECB and Fed will continue to use their virtually unlimited firepower to keep rates low and liquidity abundant in markets.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking