Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Weekly Update - The Japanese Whale, or the Retail Shoal?

The US equity market has outperformed other major markets since the 2008-2009 recession and this year has seen another strong run despite the COVID-19 recession. Part of Wall Street’s attraction has been the emergence of a small number of megacap leaders in information technology and internet platforms. Since end-August, these stocks have seen a bout of sharp weakness. What does all this mean for the outlook for markets?

In recent years, Information Technology has become the largest single sector in the US equity market, currently accounting for 28% of market capitalisation. Moreover, a number of large companies often considered as tech stocks now sit in other sectors.
For example, Amazon, which accounts for 5% of the S&P500 index, is now classified as a Consumer Discretionary stock while Facebook (around 2.5% of the index) is included in Communications. As of end-August, many of these stocks had registered massive year-to-date (YTD) gains – Apple was up 76%, Microsoft 43%, Amazon 87%, Alphabet (Google’s holding company) up 22% and Facebook 43% – well ahead of the index which was up 8.3%. Given their size and the scale of their gains, these companies have dominated S&P500 performance this year. In fact, the equallyweighted version of the index – where the smallest stock counts for as much as Apple – was actually down 4% YTD at end-August. This means that the breadth of the market – that is, the proportion of stocks which are contributing to index gains – has deteriorated sharply this year, often a warning sign for investors.
Moreover, price gains have outstripped earnings forecasts by a substantial margin – for example, earnings-per-share (EPS) estimates for Apple’s current financial year are up by only 9% compared to 2019. This means that the bulk of this year’s performance has come through multiple expansion – the mega-caps (and hence the market as a whole) have simply become ever more expensive. As a result, US equities currently trade at 27 times this year’s EPS, a 64% premium to the median valuation over the last decade.
The month of August saw a sharp move higher for the S&P500, up another 7% during what is normally one of the quietest periods for equity trading. Normally, when equity markets are moving higher, risk aversion tends to decline. One of the tools used to gauge risk appetite is the implied volatility of options on the S&P500, as measured by the VIX index – when this index moves lower, this suggests investors are becoming more complacent and adventurous. This August however, the VIX rose as prices advanced – a most unusual state of affairs. Part of the explanation for this apparent contradiction may lie in some unusual trading patterns in options on individual stocks, in particular “call” options which give holders the right to buy a stock at an agreed price and by a fixed date. The proportion of options to sell stocks (known as “puts”) compared to calls reached multiyear lows in August as traders used options to leverage their exposure to tech stocks. Part of the buying was carried out by Japanese conglomerate SoftBank (dubbed the “Nasdaq whale”), which spent $4bn on calls recently, but this was dwarfed by a shoal of retail investors who spent almost $40bn on calls in the last four weeks – the average 4-week total paid for calls had never been above $10bn until this year. Given such heavy volume, investment banks which issued the calls have been forced to hedge their risks by purchasing the underlying stocks, thereby adding to the buying pressure.

Bottom line. The quality and strength of the mega-cap tech and internet stocks has justified their rise to pre-eminence in the market. However, this has come at the price of heavy index concentration, speculative flows and skyrocketing valuations. These factors have led us to diversify portfolios into other assets, markets and sectors to maintain balance, as outlined in our Q3 House Views. This month’s sell-off in tech only reinforces that conviction.

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Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking