Private clients Financial intermediaries

Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Globe trekker

Some facts, figures and examples of changes that will transform the world of tomorrow

Australia

Immediate boarding for... The unknown

After the incredible success of its “flight to nowhere” (150 seats sold in 10 minutes!), the Australian airline Qantas is now launching “mystery flights”. Passengers embark on a day of adventure, including meals and activities, with a low-altitude flight to see the scenery up close. And for the rest, well it remains a mystery! Only the airport of departure gives a few clues to help you pack: “Wide open spaces and country hospitality” for Brisbane, “Tropics and salt water” for Sydney, “Wide open spaces and local farmers’ markets” for Melbourne. An initiative that appeals to both tourism operators and Australians, whose travel is currently limited to domestic trips only.

Egypt

The end of camel rides in Giza

It took a year of lobbying by PETA and 100,000 supporters for the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism to finally agree to ban animal rides around the pyramids of Giza and other archaeologically famous areas. An investigation by the association revealed the systematic mistreatment of camels and horses and the extreme conditions in which they transported visitors to the foot of the world’s oldest wonder. Animals will now be replaced by electric vehicles. The NGO is urging other sites, such as the Greek island of Santorini, which uses mules and donkeys for tourism, to do the same.

Chile

Pioneer of “neuro-rights”

Chile is in the process of becoming the first country in the world to legislate on neurotechnologies and to enshrine brain rights or “neuro-rights” in its constitution. While neurotechnologies hold great promise for curing certain diseases (Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s), they also make it possible to record our mental data. In the near future, they might even be able to change it. The Chilean bill, already adopted unanimously by the Senate, intends to regulate research and practices to protect citizens from possible manipulation but also from a two-tier evolution, with some humans augmented and others not. The country hopes to bring about the emergence of a universal declaration in the spirit of the human rights declaration.

Argentina

A newspaper that can't catch fire

Newspapers should spread information, not flames: that’s the innovative idea of the Argentine daily Noticias de la Comarca. They have joined forces with the Argentine Firemen’s Foundation to create the first fireproof newspaper and thus raise public awareness of the forest fires that have been particularly devastating in recent years. The special “fireproof” edition, which has been widely publicised on social networks around the world, has the headline “The Cordillera in Flames” on the front page. This innovative campaign has reached over 14 million people and has increased donations to the Argentinian Firemen’s Foundation sixfold.

Nepal

2.2 tonnes of waste collected

During the pandemic, Sherpas took advantage of the absence of tourists to clean several Himalayan mountains. The initiative was launched in 2019 by the Bally Peak Outlook Foundation and overseen by environmental activist and mountaineer Dawa Steven Sherpa. The second expedition took place during the health crisis, with the “8 x 8,000 metres” operation. This was aimed at cleaning up the camps of eight 8,000-metre Himalayan mountains, restoring the landscape in which local communities live. The 47-day expedition collected 2.2 tonnes of waste that had been accumulating for decades.