Become a client

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Julien Garnier, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address: servicequalite.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Global trekker

Some facts, figures and examples of changes that will transform the world of tomorrow.

6.6

In 2019, Facebook removed almost 6.6 billion fake accounts registered on its social network — almost as many as the Earth’s population. Facebook has been able to detect these fake accounts thanks to an AI based model of machine learning capable of analysing the behaviour of profiles and their interactions with the rest of the community.

China

The bionic eye

Researchers at the University of Hong Kong have been focussing their attention on developing a functional electrochemical eye, equipped with an artificial retina composed of nano-sensors that mimic the photoreceptor cells of the human eye. This innovation could help restore sight to some 250 million visually impaired people worldwide. The current prototype is still of relatively low resolution (100 pixels), with a somewhat narrow field of view (100 degrees instead of 160 for the human eye), but researchers estimate that this bionic eye will outperform the human eye within only five years. This important discovery is also being considered for humanoid robots.

Germany

Eco-Streaming

All Netflix subscribers together emit as much C02 in one second, as a car circling the Earth 3.8 times. This is the tag-line of the Berlin-based start-up Plantyflix, which intends to raise awareness among fans of series and binge watching of the ecological impact of Netflix and other on-demand video platforms. It allows viewers to offset their carbon footprints by paying a fee, the amount of which varies depending on their consumption (from 1 to 6 euros per month). Half of the income collected is donated to the NGO Eden Reforestation Projects to plant trees in different countries around the world. Their objective: 1 million trees planted by the end of this year.

France

A haven for the electro-sensitive

The hamlet of Durbon, in les Hautes-Alpes, is one of the last ‘white areas’ in France, where neither mobile network nor Internet is accessible. This is viewed as a godsend for the Association Zones Blanches (AZB) which wants to preserve this electromagnetic radiation-free zone and set up a medical-social centre for those suffering from Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity (EHS) and Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS). The centre, which intends to combine care and research, would be the first dedicated to these unusual pathologies in Europe.

Japan

Poimo, the inflatable electric scooter

A scooter that fits into a ruck-sack? Yes, you’d better believe it! Developed by researchers at the University of Tokyo, it even fits into a small backpack, since it weighs only 5.5 kilos. Poimo — short for Portable and Inflatable Mobility — is inflatable and has only five parts: two pairs of wheels, an electric motor combined with a battery and two handlebar grips in which a wireless control for driving is hidden. Poimo can be inflated in 71 seconds, thanks to the small electric pump included. The machine is still only a prototype, but it has potential. Have a nice trip, Poimo!

Bhutan

Stamps of all kinds

Collecting Bhutanese stamps has contributed hugely to the popularisation of this small country, landlocked in the Himalayas between India and China. Its inhabitants were not particularly fond of posting letters, but these stamps were a useful source of foreign currency that helped develop the kingdom. It was an American, Burt Kerr Todd, who came up with the idea for these somewhat original stamps in the 1960s: stamps on steel or silk, and even small rubber washers with micro-grooves that play the national anthem or CD-Rom stamps containing a documentary on the history of the country.