Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

The world of Jean-Michel Wilmotte

Arty - Hotels, villas, stadiums, head offices, museums… The internationally renowned architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte knows few creative boundaries. We join him to gain insights into his professional philosophy and his sources of inspiration. Interview by Laurence Boccara, journalist specialising in real estate and architecture

The architectural agency Wilmotte & Associés is celebrating its 45th anniversary. What is the common denominator in your activities (town planning, architecture, design, interior architecture and museology)?

Jean-Michel Wilmotte: Some may indeed wonder what there is in common between creating a door handle or a waste-paper basket, designing sports equipment, a vineyard, a city district or a house. Despite this diversity of scales, what has always fascinated me is the challenge of inventing a tailor-made “object” while respecting the need for elegance, detail and excellence, to perfectly align the object to its environment.

What are your sources of inspiration?

J.-M. W.: We currently work in 29 countries. Whenever I first come to a city to start a new project, I’m curious about everything. Even on the road that takes me from the airport to my meeting venue, I’m already observing everything around me. I try to capture the spirit of the moment, the ambiance, and to soak up the environment around me. I need to walk a lot in a city: through the food markets, for example, because they give a real picture of daily life, but also I like to wander through the gardens, the museums and the city itself.

What inspires an architect when taking on a new commission? What can you bring when studying the specifications of a particular job?

J.-M. W.: At the start of a project, I do appreciate having a lively exchange with the sponsor, a bit like in a game of ping pong, if you will. I listen to them carefully to try to understand what they need in order to offer them the most appropriate solutions. The more constraints there are to a project, the more opportunities there are to express yourself, actually. In this profession, our art form consists of navigating obstacles and constantly responding positively to them. My response as an architect is inspired by both the client’s request, my experience, and the symbiosis of local elements that I take on board.

Do you have favourite materials?

J.-M. W.: The choice of materials is an important step in my work. These should be both contemporary and timeless. Depending on the project, I might opt for glass, wood, stone (preferably local), steel. Sometimes, for a specific technical or aesthetic reason, we are obliged to treat the chosen material, using high-tech tools, sand, oxidation or metalising, to give it a different appearance. For example, the golden “dome” of the Paris Orthodox Cathedral was created from a composite material used for boat hulls. As a result, this dome is six times lighter than if it had been made of wood and metal. Since the 1980s, the agency has kept a “material library”. It is a large collection of the materials that have already been used in our projects, plus new materials and prototypes. This acts as a real source of inspiration.

You published a book a few years ago entitled Interior Architecture of Cities. What does this expression mean to you?

J.-M. W.: A city should be designed like a house. To feel good, everything must be considered at a human scale, with particular care given to the shape and size of buildings, urban lighting and the ground, without forgetting green spaces and the presence of art. All these elements give dignity to a public space. Nobody would spit in their own living room: so you have to transpose this response to the level of the city.

“  Today, the best way to be green is to renovate. This helps avoid the inevitable destruction that is a part of any rebuilding project. I have always enjoyed giving new life to old buildings.  ”

You often talk about architectural “grafting”. Is it possible to make something new from the old?

J.-M. W.: Today, the best way to be green is to renovate. This helps avoid the inevitable destruction that is a part of any rebuilding project. I have always enjoyed giving new life to old buildings. The important thing is to retain the memory of spaces and locations, whilst adding a contemporary and complementary aspect. The old Richaud hospital in Versailles has been transformed into a residential building with a beautiful cultural space and a crèche. Founded in 2005, the Wilmotte Foundation is organising the 9th edition of a competition dedicated to renovating buildings this year. The W Prize is open to young students and recent graduates, and winning projects will be exhibited at the Venice Biennale.

Architectural projects, which often require a long gestation period, confront a world where everything is seemingly getting faster and faster. Does this require an adaptation in the process?

J.-M. W.: You certainly have to be able to adapt to deadlines, especially since the time necessary to complete projects can differ significantly. The Sophia Antipolis campus on the Côte d’Azur and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam took more than thirteen years to complete, while the Orthodox Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Paris was built in two years, and the Allianz Riviera stadium in Nice in 500 days.

What are your main projects at the moment?

J.-M. W.: We have just completed the Palais des Congrès du Touquet. We are currently working on the future Parisian campus for Sciences Po University, the Paris-Saint-Germain training centre at Poissy, the headquarters of ArcelorMittal in Luxembourg, and a project for United Nations House in Diamniadio, Senegal. To this, I should also add the Centre for Islamic Civilization in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

Wilmotte & Associés in figures

280

employees of 31 nationalities.

www.wilmotte.fr

5

international offices.

100

simultaneous projects.

more than 500

completed projects to date.