Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Frankfurt, city of art and finance

Frankfurt inevitably evokes the world of finance. What is less well known is that since the early 2000s, the city has radically modernized and developed its museum infrastructure, becoming a fully-fledged cultural destination for the art lover.

Frankfurt inevitably evokes the world of finance. After the establishment of the European Central Bank in 1998, the capital of the state of Hesse attracted many financial institutions. This trend has accelerated recently, with the European headquarters of several international banks such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, Nomura, Sumitomo Mitsui, UBS, Credit Suisse and Standard Chartered moving into Europe in anticipation of Brexit.

What is less well known is that since the early 2000s, the city has radically modernized and developed its museum infrastructure, becoming a fully-fledged cultural destination for the art lover. Frankfurt now has around 50 museums and exhibition centres, most of which are located along the banks of the Main River and a stone's throw from the historic city centre. Some have undergone major renovations or extensions (Schirn Kunsthalle, Museum of Applied Arts and Museum of World Cultures, in particular), while others have come out of the ground ex nihilo. Among the latest additions are the MMK 2 contemporary art centre in the Taunus Turm (Taunus Tower), the Goldkammer (opened in 2019) and the Museum of Electronic Music, which will open in 2020.

This dynamism has of course took advantage from the real estate boom and the development of the city's business district, which have generated significant tax revenues. It has also benefited, in many cases, from the direct support of local businesses, reviving a historical tradition of patronage dating back to the early 19th century. Thus, it was a banker and spice merchant, Johann Friedrich Städl, who in 1815 gave birth -along with his name -to one of the most important German museums, where visitors can discover a unique collection of European art from the 16th to the 20th century, while the "Kunstverein" of Frankfurt, a major centre for contemporary art on the German scene, was created on the initiative of the city's citizens and merchants in 1829.

This tradition of cultural patronage continues resolutely in our time. In this respect, the reading of the "tableaux d'honneur" devoted to the patrons of museums and art centres is edifying, given the large number of institutional donors. The Städl Museum, for example, enjoys the support of some fifty companies, while the MMK Museum of Modern Art is supported by some sixty institutional friends, private foundations -starting with the Jürgen Ponto Foundation, former head of the Dresdner Bank -and financial institutions, led by a dynamic circle of friends, chaired by the industrialist Stefan Quandt. In the panorama of the great patrons of contemporary Frankfurt, it is impossible, finally, not to mention Carlo and Karin Giersch, who have made their fortune in the international distribution of electronic components, and whose philanthropic involvement takes the form of the foundation of several museums, student residences, eponymous research centers, but also of a multifaceted support to the arts, science and medicine.

The result of this remarkable combination of ambition and means is that Frankfurt has created in the space of a few decades a formidable showcase for the arts and sets an example of virtuous development, where economic growth, thanks to the involvement of its major players in local development, is bringing culture in its wake.

 

Laurent Issaurat & Petra Mennong

Laurent Issaurat