Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking ? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data ?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim ?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Flash Update - Less Than Zero – what on earth happened to oil prices?

In the hours leading up to the April 21 expiry of the US crude oil futures contract, prices suddenly collapsed into negative territory, reaching minus $40 per barrel (/b) before recovering to settle at $10/b, the lowest level since the 1980s. What caused this unprecedented crash? And what is the likely outlook for the oil market?

Oil prices were already weak ahead of the emergence of worries about the coronavirus. At the start of the year, the Energy
Information Agency (EIA) showed oil supply outstripping demand (see right-hand chart) with shale producers ramping up US output to all-time highs.
By the time China announced the Hubei lockdown on the eve of the lunar New Year holiday, Brent prices had fallen 8% since end-December. As the spread of the pandemic gathered pace in the following weeks, oil prices continued their decline as
traders realised that restrictions on activity and travel would sharply curtail oil demand.
This shift in the market put pressure on OPEC and its allies, led by Russia, to agree output cuts at their early-March meeting.
However, hopes were dashed after Russia declined to cut its production further. Saudi Arabia then declared a price war by raising the kingdom’s output by 25%, hoping to pressure US shale producers into cutting theirs.
The resulting imbalance in the oil market has been severe. It now looks as if the coronavirus-driven collapse in consumption will see a reduction of between 20 and 30 mb/d this month. By end March, Brent was down 65% year-to date, prompting
President Trump to broker another emergency meeting between OPEC and Russia. However, negotiations were arduous and it was hardly surprising that the 9.7 mb/d cuts finally agreed on April 12th failed to stabilise the market.
With refinery demand down 25% in recent weeks, storage capacity has been filling up rapidly, especially in the United States where output has only dipped 7% from March’s record highs. In Cushing, Oklahoma where West Texas Intermediate crude –
the basis of US futures trading – is stored, tanks were around 80% full on April 17 according to the EIA. And Plains All-American Pipeline – a large US oil transporter – expects all available capacity to be full by early May.
This was the dynamic which pushed US crude prices into negative territory. Holders of the oil futures contracts which expired on April 21 are obliged to take physical delivery of crude in May. With no capacity left, traders were unable to arrange for storage of the oil they had undertaken to buy and were forced to offload their contracts at heavy losses. On Monday April 20, prices fell towards zero and then plunged into negative territory – in effect the forced sellers had to pay buyers to take on their contracts. Once the dust settled at expiry, prices had recovered over $50 from Monday’s low but still settled at the lowest price since 1986.

Bottom Line. In coming weeks, this dynamic is unlikely to change. Coronavirus lockdowns and travel restrictions will keep oil demand depressed and output is unlikely to fall far enough to stabilise the market. Moreover, limited storage capacity will keep traders nervous about delivery problems, meaning that oil prices are likely to remain low and extremely volatile for now. It is only once lockdowns have eased, production cuts have been implemented and the surplus oil in storage has been shipped for refining that the oil market will be able to stabilise.

Read full article

Head of Investment Strategy Societe Generale Private Banking