Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

Behavioural Finance: first lessons of this new school year

For the youngest, September rhymes with the return to school. Let's take advantage of this back-to-school week to present two behavioural biases: the "anchoring bias" and the "halo bias". Let's take a look at some illustrations from school life and their translation into the financial world.

Behavioural finance is defined by the application of psychology to finance: it differs from classical financial theory by considering individuals not as purely rational beings, but as being influenced by their emotions or by reasoning biases. For the youngest, September rhymes with the return to school. Let's take advantage of this back-to-school week to present two behavioural biases: the "anchoring bias" and the "halo bias". Let's take a look at some illustrations from school life and their translation into the financial world.

The anchoring bias present both at the first bad grade and when buying a schoolbag

 

If the start of the school year is synonymous with a reunion in the playground, it is often also marked by a few knowledge tests in the first few weeks. Let's imagine that Louis, a newcomer to the school, fails his first math homework assignment. In the absence of other marks in the subject and of history within the school, he will be judged as very poor in mathematics; both by his teacher and by his classmates. However, this subject could have been his strongest subject for several years and this poor grade could only be the result of a particular stress, a concept not taught last year or any other specific reason. The judgment of others will be influenced by this bad grade which will "stick to him". This is a typical example of "anchoring bias", which is defined by the difficulty in letting go of one's first impression.

This bias is very present in the triggering of purchasing acts: price negotiations, discussions around an estimate, posting of discounts .. Thus, the starting price is an "anchor" for our brain that focuses on the economy obtained in relation to this anchor. To continue on the theme of the start of the school year, whatever the poor quality of the corrected homework given to Louis, he will have to put it away in a binder. For the school supplies salesman, it will be much more effective to communicate the price outside the promotion and then mention the savings that will be made than to display the price directly after discounts. The feeling of getting a good deal will be conducive to triggering the act of buying!

Anchor bias plays an important role in investor behaviour. As an illustration, it is generally very difficult to sell a security at a loss in value when one knows its purchase price: one tends to cling to this reference even though it may have become completely obsolete, for example due to a very different economic context. Thus, regardless of the loss incurred on this security, one should look at investments - with the same level of risk -offering a higher upside potential.

The halo bias: in the continuity of the anchoring bias!

 

"Catalogued" because of his poor grade in mathematics, Louis will most likely also be penalized by the "halo effect". This bias is defined as a selective interpretation and perception of information in the direction of the first impression. While the halo effect can be positive (favourable interpretation), Louis will suffer from a negative halo effect. As an illustration, if another teacher learns about his bad math result, the teacher will have a less complacent view of Louis' work in his subject!

But let's come back to the purchase of the famous schoolbag: Louis would like one from a fashionable brand. He is probably a "victim" of the "halo effect" - positive this time -that marketing uses abundantly.  Thus, communication and advertising around brands aim to create a positive perception by consumers in order to influence them when they buy. In this particular case, one could easily imagine that the students' favourite brand has gained notoriety thanks to the use of celebrities promoting it. Alternatively, Louis might appreciate this school bag, regardless of its sturdiness or functionality, simply because it is of the same brand as clothes with which he has had a very positive experience.

In terms of personal finance, the "halo bias" can influence a investment decision in an asset class, product or industry that has generated significant capital gains in the past. Another example is that the share price of a publicly traded company may increase due to the reputation of its manager, its brand or the quality of its products. unrelated to financial performance!

Welcome back, everyone!

Édouard Camblain Head of strategic projects & development