Contact

Are you a client? You should contact your private banker. 
You are not a client but would like to have more information about Societe Generale Private Banking? Please fill in the form below.

Local contacts

France : +33 (0) 1 42 14 20 00 (9am - 5pm)
Luxembourg : +352 47 93 11 1 (8:30am - 6pm)
Monaco : +377 97 97 58 00 (9/12am - 2/5pm)
Switzerland : Geneva +41 22 819 02 02
& Zurich +41 44 218 56 11 (8:30am - 5:30pm)

You would like to contact about the protection of your personal data?

Please contact the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking France by sending an email to the following address : protectiondesdonnees@societegenerale.fr.

Please contact Bieneke Russon, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Bank & Trust Luxembourg by phone : +352-47.93.93.11.5046 or by sending an email to the following address : lux.dpooffice@socgen.com.

Please contact Céline Pastor, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco by sending an email to the following address : list.mon-privmonaco-dpo@socgen.com

Please contact Omar Otmani, the Data Protection Officer of Societe Generale Private Banking Switzerland by sending an email to the following address : sgpb-gdpr.ch@socgen.com.

You need to make a claim?

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking France should be sent by e-mail to the following address : FR-SGPB-Relations-Clients@socgen.com or by mail to : 

Société Générale Private Banking France
Direction Commerciale
29 boulevard Haussmann CS 614
75421 Paris Cedex 9

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 60 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you by mail. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact : 

 

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman

The Societe Generale Group’s Ombudsman can be contacted by the following website : mediateur.societegenerale.fr  or by mail :

Le Médiateur auprès de Société Générale
17 Cours Valmy 
92987 PARIS LA DEFENSE CEDEX 7
France

In reviewing any matter, the Ombudsman undertakes the consideration of both the client’s and the bank’s point of view, evaluates arguments from each of the parties and makes a decision in all fairness.

The Group’s Ombudsman will respond to you directly within two months of receipt of the written submissions of the parties relating to the claim.

 

The Ombudsman of the AMF

The Ombudsman of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) can be contacted at the following address :

Médiateur de l'AMF, Autorité des Marchés Financier
17 place de la Bourse
75082 PARIS CEDEX 02
FRANCE


The Insurance Ombudsman

Please contact the Insurance Ombudsman : contact details must be mentioned in your insurance contract.

To ensure that your requests are handled effectively, any claim addressed to Societe Generale Bank & Trust should be sent to:

Private banking Claims department
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 10 days and provide a response to your claim within 30 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex research), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe.

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest the following :

Initially, you may wish to contact the SGBT Division responsible for handling claims, at the following address:

Corporate Secretariat of Societe Generale Bank & Trust
11, Avenue Emile Reuter
L-2420 Luxembourg

If the response from the Division responsible for claims does not resolve the claim, you may wish to contact Societe Generale Bank & Trust's supervisory authority, the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier (Financial Sector Supervisory Commission) :

By mail: 283, Route d’Arlon L-1150 Luxembourg
By e-mail:direction@cssf.lu

 Any claim addressed to Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco should be sent by e-mail to the following address : reclamation.privmonaco@socgen.com or by mail to our dedicated department : 

Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco
Middle Office – Service Réclamation 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne
98000 Monaco

The Bank will acknowledge your request within 2 days after receipt and provide a response to your claim within 10 days of receipt. If your request requires additional processing time (e.g. if it involves complex researches…), the Bank will inform you of this situation within the same 30-day timeframe. 

In the event that the response you receive does not meet your expectations, we suggest to contact the Societe Generale Private Banking Direction that handles the claims by mail at the following address : 

Secrétariat Général de Societe Generale Private Banking Monaco 
11 avenue de Grande Bretagne 
98000 Monaco

Any claim addressed to the Bank can be sent by email to: sgpb-reclamations.ch@socgen.com
Clients may also contact the Swiss Banking Ombudsman : www.bankingombudsman.ch

County galway in every sense

A new take on travel - Galway, European Capital of Culture in 2020, is also renowned for its gastronomy. Add the music of local pubs, and the sublime landscapes of neighbouring Connemara – this region of Ireland is guaranteed to bring joy to every one of the five senses. By Christian Simenc, travel journalist.

Music before anything else

Until recently, many people only saw Galway as “the door to Connemara.” Perhaps it is time to set the record straight. Certainly Connemara, one of the most sublime regions of the West of Ireland, has no need for a door: it is already a window opening out onto spectacular nature. Galway, the country’s fourth city, which was named the European Capital of Culture this year, has strengths of its own. Starting with its music, which could not be more traditional. It is an institution, if not a way of life, be it improvised scenes on the pedestrian streets of the Latin Quarter or dedicated venues, such as The Crane (Sea Road) or Tig Coili (Mainguard Street) pubs. On a wall of the latter, a sign reads: “Please, Respect the Musicians!”. Flute, violin, banjo, concertina (small accordion), guitar… the combinations are endless and the notes freely flowing, much like the local beer, the Galway Hooker. Sometimes a client launches a cappella... And everyone spontaneously burts into song.

In Galway, the senses are also played by other kinds of master conductor: those of the culinary arts. In recent years, the city has become a Mecca for gastronomy. At Kai (Sea Road), the creative menu offers, among other things, a grated celery salad with County Clare crab, sprinkled with pumpkin seeds, or Roscommon lamb chops with beetroot and green tahini. Barely nine months after its opening in 2015, the Loam restaurant (Geata na Cathrach, Fairgreen Road) won a Michelin star. Its chef, Enda McEvoy, displays an undisguised enthusiasm for Western Irish products: “I have forged close relationships with local farmers and producers,” he explains.
I also cook with what the region gives me, such as whey algae or wild garlic, which I pick myself in the mountains in summer and dry for the winter.” Apart from the pheasant with chanterelle or the wild duck with salsify and chicory, its “signature dish” is none other than the squid with shiitake. “In our region, the seafood and crustaceans are delicious,” says Enda McEvoy.

Oysters and sheep

Ireland being an island, the smells and tastes of the sea are never far away. A stone’s throw from Galway, the Connemara region is a great supplier of oysters. Many bays, such as Ballinakill, provide clear water, rich in plankton. Renowned for their subtle taste, the local shellfish — Crassostrea gigas — are exported worldwide. Be it the Connemara Oyster Festival at Ballyconneely, or the Galway International Oyster & Seafood Festival - there is no shortage of events dedicated to shellfish. On dry land or, more precisely, on the grassy slopes of Killary Harbour, Tom Nee, part of the fourth generation of a family of sheep breeders, tends a herd of 600 animals. His Blackface Connemara are direct descendants of those imported in bulk from Scotland by boat, in the nineteenth century. Even over long distances, Tom Nee calls out his orders through short and strident shouts, so that his dog, a young Border Collie, can herd the animals. “A simple glance from him and the sheep obey immediately”, emphasises his master. “His eyes are as powerful as those of a wolf”.The demonstration is astonishing. And the contrast between the black heads and the white of the fleece is certainly amusing. Even if the use of wool is something very traditional, it is still a material very much in demand today.

A light that changes with each moment

The natural landscape of Connemara is dreamlike, with a beauty that is wild and rugged, yet also holds an irresistible charm. Between Maam Cross and Clifden, on the N59, it is impossible to miss Pines Island. It looks just like a painting. Standing at one end of Lake Derryclare, this wind-swept isle of tall conifers is no exception. In the morning fog, it is like a Chinese watercolour, washed out with ink. Under a ray of sunshine, it becomes a Japanese garden with oversized bonsai trees. This region swept by the sea is a patchwork of peat bogs, colours changing with the light, and small lakes — the Loughs — with deep and black waters. The sky is reflected within, multiplying the feeling of infinite space. Between the town of Clifden and the small fishing port of Roundstone, there is a bumpy road: the Bog Road. It winds between endless moors and bogs, with the bald silhouette of the Twelve Bens mountains in the distance. The waterlogged soil region is as soft as a sponge. On 15th June 1919, the biplane of English pilots John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown crash-landed and broke in two in the Derrigimlagh Bog, after a 3,000 km journey from the island of Newfoundland, in Canada.

And the aptly named Sky Road, a sublime narrow and winding stretch, seems to hang from the clouds. It weaves around the Kingstown Peninsula, between Clifden Bay to the south and Streamstown Bay to the north. The panorama is breathtaking. What’s more, at dawn, when the mists are still in the hollows, just the very tops of a few houses can be seen. We lose sight of the world below... The world of people.

The tweed project, a new generation wool

In 2014, Aoibheann McNamara and Triona Lillis opened a small workshop in Galway called The Tweed Project. Favouring a «Slow Fashion» approach by focusing on quality, craftsmanship and respect for the environment, the two designers use Irish linen and premium tweed from the Donegal region. Through their collections — clothing and plaids — with contemporary lines, they infuse modernity and a certain softer touch into the uncompromising fabric of the past.

5 MUSTS-VISITS WHEN EXPLORING COUNTY GALWAY

Galway, European Capital of Culture...

Until January 2021, from Galway to the wild landscapes of Connemara, a myriad of cultural events (theatre, music, dance, cinema, literature and... gastronomy) to charm the lucky traveller.
www.galway2020.ie

... and world capital of gastronomy

At the end of December, the British culinary magazine BBC Good Food designated Galway as “the world’s premier foodie destination for 2020”. Culinary creativity is certainly not an empty boast. Opened in 2016, John Keogh’s gastropub (22-24 Upper Dominick St.) was voted “Irish Pub-of-the-Year” by the McKennas guide last year. On the menu: salmon marinated in whiskey, pork belly stewed with cider... At Ruibin Galway (1 Dock Rd), the oysters are accompanied by a vinaigrette seasoned with yuzu.

The Quay House, Clifden

At the far end of the port, the old harbour master’s office, built in 1818, has been transformed into a cosy haven of peaceful tranquillity, with around fifteen rooms. Served in front of the boats, the breakfast — smoked salmon, farmhouse cheeses and oysters, when in season, — is sumptuous.
www.thequayhouse.com

Remarkable buildings

While travelling through Connemara, visitors can experience two pearls of Irish heritage, built in the nineteenth century. Situated on a shore of Pollacappull Lake, Kylemore Abbey is a Victorian-style mansion, part of which still houses Benedictine sisters. Converted into a luxury hotel, Ballynahinch Castle is an architectural gem hidden in the heart of 450 hectares of forest and rhododendrons.

On the road again

Connemara is traversed by splendid roads. In addition to Sky Road and Bog Road, do take a ramble along a section of the West Irish Wild Atlantic Way (2,500 km), which runs along the jagged coast, from Galway to Killary Harbour.

Finding your way around

After a day in Galway, head for Clifden (1 hour 30 mins drive). From there you can visit Connemara Park. But you should allow three days to explore its many wonders in full.